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Introduction

Tephra Institute of Contemporary Art (Tephra ICA) presents Time Sensitive, an exhibition of works by Myanmar artist collective, 3AM, curated by Adriel Luis.

Since 2016, members Ma Ei, Ko Latt, and Yadanar Win have collaborated on works that dissolve the lines between art and activism, performance, and media.

3AM's work responds to social conditions that are pressing in Myanmar, but that resonate throughout the world – the repression of social critique, the complexities of queer life, and the effects of globalization, to name a few. Ever since Myanmar's military coup in February this year, internet shutdowns, public uprisings, and police violence against demonstrators and artists, the nation's turmoils have been placed back in the global spotlight.

Tephra ICA is pleased to show 3AM's works in the United States for the first time in support of the collective's efforts to share Myanmar's lived experiences, critical perspectives, and radical imaginations with the rest of the world. 

image of 3am artwork

Image courtesy of 3AM

About 3AM

3AM is a pioneering performance art trio based in Myanmar. Its members, Ma Ei, Ko Latt, and Yadanar Win, exhibited internationally as individual artists before becoming a collective in 2016 during a collaboration in Stockholm, Sweden. 3AM’s performances blend improvisation and routine action, and are set in studios as well as public space before live audiences. Captured on photography and video, they are experimentations on body, space, time, and personal objects. The artists’ works are strongly focused on current social and political issues, and directly confront the challenges and struggles of contemporary artists in Myanmar.

Portrait of Adriel Luis

Image courtesy of Adriel Luis

About the Guest Curator

Adriel Luis is a community organizer, artist, and curator who believes in collective imagination as a pathway toward liberation. His work is focused on bridging artistic integrity and social vigilance. He is a part of the iLL-Literacy arts collective, which creates music and media to strengthen Black and Asian American coalitions; is creative director of Bombshelltoe, which works with artists to highlight marginalized communities affected by nuclear issues; and collaborates with dozens of artists and organizations through his curate and design engine, Phenomenoun. Adriel is the Curator of Digital and Emerging Practice at the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, where he advocates for equitable practices in museums and institutions. Adriel has been a speaker at the Tate Modern, Yale University, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and the China Academy of Fine Arts. He has a degree in human sciences from UC Davis in Community and Regional Development and a minor in Asian American Studies.

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